‘Ofsted-style’ inspections and unlimited fines for failing social landlords

June 13, 2022

Failing social housing landlords could face unlimited fines and Ofsted-style inspections, under the Social Housing Regulation Bill which was introduced to Parliament on 8 June 2022.

The Regulator of Social Housing will have stronger powers to issue unlimited fines, enter properties with only 48 hours’ notice – down from 28 days – and make emergency repairs where there is a serious risk to tenants, with landlords footing the bill.

In a major reset of power between tenants and landlords, residents will be able to demand information and rate their landlord as part of new satisfaction measures. The Bill will form a key part of the government’s mission to level up across the country and deliver on the people’s priorities.

Tenants will have a direct line to government, with a new 250-person residents panel convening every four months to share their experiences with ministers, inform policy thinking and help drive change in the sector.

The Bill is the latest step in addressing the systemic issues identified following the Grenfell Tower tragedy, not just on the safety and quality of social housing, but about how tenants are treated by their landlords.

Levelling Up Secretary Michael Gove said: “In 2022 it is disgraceful that anyone should live in damp, cold and unsafe homes, waiting months for repairs and being routinely ignored by their landlord. These new laws will end this injustice and ensure the regulator has strong new powers to take on rogue social landlords.”

“We are driving up the standards of social housing and giving residents a voice to make sure they get the homes they deserve. That is levelling up in action.”

The Social Housing (Regulation) Bill being introduced removes the serious detriment test – a legislative barrier that once axed will make it easier for the Regulator to tackle poor performing landlords.

The biggest social housing providers will face regular inspections and the Levelling Up Secretary will continue to name and shame worst offenders to make sure residents are living in good quality homes.

The Bill will also mean landlords will need to have a named person who will be responsible for health and safety requirements. And tenants of housing associations will be able to request information from their landlord, similar to how the Freedom of Information Act works for council housing.

 

This is valid as of 13th June 2022.

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